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Eat the peel


Getting enough FRESH fruits and vegetables is incredibly important to keeping a well balanced diet not to mention food is always the best way to get your vitamins and minerals naturally. But some people do not realise that in many instances, they are throwing out the most nutritionally valuable part of their fruits and vegetables, the skin. Some may surprise you that skin have just as much, if not more, nutritional value as their flesh.


Oranges: in all likelihood, the first thing you do when you eat an orange is tear off that thick peel and throw it straight into the garbage. You are missing out on a lot of nutrients. The peel of an orange has nearly twice as much vitamin C as the flesh inside. It also contains higher concentrations of riboflavin, vitamin B6, calcium, magnesium and potassium. The peel's flavonoids have anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties. Citrus fruit also boosts iron absorption. As nutritious as citrus peels are, you're unlikely to start eating oranges whole. The entire peel is bitter and difficult to digest. Instead, grate the peel using a microplane or another tool and sprinkle it on top of salads, or in a vinaigrette dressing.


Apples: the skin of an apple contains about half of the apple's overall dietary fiber content. A medium apple also delivers 9 milligrams of vitamin C, 100 IUs of vitamin A, and 200 grams of potassium. By removing the peel, you lose about a third of those nutrients. The peel also has four times more vitamin K than its flesh, about 5% of your daily value. An antioxidant called quercetin, found mostly in the apple's skin, can help Lung function, ease breathing problems and protect your lungs from irritants. Quercetin is also believed to fight off brain tissue damage and protect your memory.


Note: enjoy QUERCETIN boys and girls.

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